According to a study, a child's sleep habits may influence how they behave.

Study found that passive sleep-supporting methods were associated with lower temperament . Passive methods of aiding a child fall asleep (eg, cuddling, singing, and reading) were linked to higher temperament .

Washington, United States, November 25, : A consortium of international researchers found that these strategies are related to the development of a child's temperament.They advised focusing on better sleep-related parenting strategies to encourage positive social growth across cultures.Bad sleep quality and behaviors are detrimental to neurobehavioral functioning, emotional regulation, and regulation, and can pose a risk to future psychopathology, according to corresponding author Ms Christie Pham of Washington State University.In a study published in Frontiers in Psychology, Pham and her colleagues examined the effects of different parental sleep-supporting methods on child temperament across 14 cultures.They believed that passive methods of aiding a child fall asleep (eg, cuddling, singing, and reading), but not more active methods (eg, riding, and playing) would be positively related to his personality.Child temperament: Children's temperament is defined as the way adults treat their emotions and their behavior.

Researchers have previously broken down temperament into three categories:- Surgency (SUR) describes positive emotions such as smiles and giggles, approach tendencies, sports, and enthusiasm;- NE describes overall distress proneness, which includes fears, anger, sadness, and stress in situations that result in anxiety, stress, and discomfort Effortful Control (EC), which emphasizes attention-based control skills and enjoyment of leisure activities.Each of the factors helps in predicting personality, academic, and interpersonal outcomes, such as personality difficulties, social competence, and academic success.The international consortium of researchers asked 841 caregivers from 14 countries (Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Finland, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Romania, Russia, Spain, South Korea, Turkey, and the United States) to complete the early childhood assessment and a daily activities questionnaire.Both groups were asked to report on their toddlers (aged 17 to 40 months, 52% male), temperament and sleep-supporting parenting skills, respectively.Using linear multilevel regression models and group-mean centring techniques, we investigated the relationship between cultural differences in sleep-supporting methods and temperament variations.

On the other hand, passive sleep-supporting strategies were associated with lower NE and higher SUR at the cultural level, as reported by Pham.At an individual level, only active sleep-supporting activities were linked to higher NE.The results show that the United States, Finland, and Netherlands topped the list, while South Korea, Turkey, and China ranked last.In contrast, rank-ordering for vital skills, the researchers find that Romania, Spain, and Chile top the list, while Turkey, Italy, and Belgium are at the bottom of the list.Our findings demonstrate the importance of sleep promotion and indicate that parental sleep habits can be potential targets for interventions to reduce risks associated with challenging temperament profiles across cultures, according to Pham.

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