According to India's Supreme Court Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, tolerance does not entail tolerating hate speech.

Supreme Court Justice D Y Chandrachud of the Supreme Court of India took the 11th convocation of Gujarat National Law University (GNLU) at Gandhinagar on Saturday . He said that standing up to hate speech does not mean standing up to hate speech .

AHMEDABAD: Justice D Y Chandrachud of the Supreme Court of India, who took the 11th convocation of Gujarat National Law University (GNLU) at Gandhinagar on Saturday, said being tolerant and accepting of others' viewpoints does not mean one should reject hate speech.I disapprove of what you say, but I will fight to death for your right to say it, and I think it must be embedded in our being, as the words are famously attributed to Voltaire.Making mistakes, being open and tolerant to others' opinions, and being accepting and accepting of others' viewpoints isn't blind conformity, according to the SC justice, who said that standing up to hate speech does not mean standing up.At the convocation on Saturday, a student is awarded his degree.

He cited American author Seth Godin and gave a comparison of the current and the wind.Although the wind draws the most attention with howls and gusts, he said that it is the current that is persistent and strong.Our enduring class and race, gender, and race systems, as well as the dynamic industrial economy are the subjects of this debate.And, if I may add, caste is also included in our vocabulary.

On the other hand, the wind is the breaking news, the most recent social media buzz and the thin layer of hype that surrounds us.It may be a useful distraction, but our true duty lies in overcoming or changing the existing.In a world where social media has a limited attention span, it's also important to remember that a lot of what we do will have a long-term effect.He said that you shouldn't be concerned about the everyday distractions, he said.

In the midst of the constant noise and confusion of ideological, socioeconomic, and moral tensions, one must be guided by the paths of your conscience and equitable motive, said Justice Chandrachud.Speak truth to authority, maintain your composure in the face of unfathomable economic injustices, and use your wealth and elevated positions to combat them.It may seem utopian, but as young wide-eyed graduates, you must aspire to be a utopia, because the harbingers of change are often hopeless dreamers.He told the young grads that it's okay to follow the heart and be driven by emotions, rather than the stoic image of the law that is often associated with a good judge or lawyer.

The GNLU won 27 gold medals for 16 students, while eight girls won 15 gold medals.