According to study, women of all ages and younger males who suffer from anxiety or depression are more prone to develop chronic illnesses.

A new study found that depression and anxiety are linked to chronic conditions . Women in all three age groups and men in their twenties who had anxiety or depression were at a much higher risk of experiencing a chronic disease than the average group of participants .

According to a systematic review published in the journal JAMA Network Open, depression and anxiety correlate with the accumulation of chronic conditions, and women of all ages and younger men are more likely to experience such disorders.The study used the health records of 40,360 adults from Olmsted County, Minnesota, from the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records-linkage scheme.Participants were grouped into three age groups of 20, 40, and 60 years, and then further divided into four groups of people with anxiety, depression, and depression, with neither anxiety nor depression present.Women in all three age groups and men in their twenties who had either anxiety or depression were at a much higher risk of experiencing a chronic disease than the average group of participants.

The least likely were in their 60s who were afraid alone.In terms of men, those who had anxiety and depression in the age 20 range were most likely to have a chronic disease, with a 72% chance increase.Whereas, men with anxiety in the age 60 range were least likely to experience a 8% decrease in risk, according to Dr. Preeti Singh, a senior consultant, clinical psychology, and chief medical officer for Lissun, who not only agrees with the conclusions of the study but also stated that the opposite is true: If the underlying mental health problem is treated or cured, it will take longer to recover from a physical illness.The reverse is also true.

In many instances, (particularly in cases of severe, chronic conditions),the therapy is invasive, laborious, and frequent.All of this creates confusion and strain for the patient.They are now in isolation, are alienated, and don't seek advice from others as a result.The shock of a chronic disease disorder as a whole could be life-threatening.