At the third international high-level conference in Oman, MoS Health Pawar argues that AMR should be acknowledged as a danger to world health.

Anti-Microbial Resistance (AMR) is a silent and invisible epidemic, says Dr Bharati Pravin Pawar . She stressed the importance of AMR and its subsequent fatal consequences .

At the third global high-level conference in Muscat, Oman, on Thursday, Union Minister of Health Dr Bharati Pravin Pawar highlighted that Anti-Microbial Resistance (AMR) is a silent and invisible epidemic, and said that AMR should be recognized as a global health danger.She stressed the importance of AMR and its subsequent fatal consequences, and stressed the importance of getting national, regional, and global support.The conference attracted 22 participants from more than 15 countries.The Quadripartite Organizations, along with Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, hosted the launch of the Multi-Stakeholder Partnership Platform on AMR.

According to MoS Health, AMR is regarded as a global health danger with severe health, political, and economic implications by the UN General Assembly, the World Health Organization (WHO), and member states, and it is heartening to note that AMR has already been prioritized by the UN General Assembly, WHO, the World Organisation for Animal Health (WOAH), and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).In 2016, India held an AMR conference in New Delhi.Her paper highlighted that combating AMR is highly prominent on the national health agenda, and mentioned that various efforts undertaken in the form of education and knowledge transfer, laboratory improvement, monitoring, infection control, antimicrobial stewardship, and evaluation of newer drugs, diagnostics, and innovations have garnered significant political support at the highest level, read the paper.Dr Pawar also highlighted the efforts undertaken by the Global AMR Conference in 2011 and the forthcoming high-level meeting on AMR at the United Nations General Assembly

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