Bad roads put barefoot worshippers travelling to Mahalaxmi to the test.

Thousands of devotees are heading to the Mahalaxmi temple on foot, but they are paying the price for the chaos on Kolhapurs roads . The pothole filling operation was postponed due to continuous rain .

Kolhapur, India: Thousands of devotees are heading to the Mahalaxmi temple on foot, but they are paying the price for the chaos on Kolhapur's roads.After two years of the Covid pandemic, Navaratra started on a high note on Monday.On Monday, 68,521 devotees visited the temple, and 1,44,921 until 7pm on Tuesday.Due to the poor state of roads in Kolhapur, especially around the famous temple, the devotion of devotees is tainting after two years of limitations.

The distance from our village to the temple is 5 kilometers.To cover the entire distance on foot, it takes about an hour.However, the course has been difficult due to the poor quality of pothole repairs.According to her, the authorities should have considered this.

Many devotees are having trouble with small crushed stones stacked over the road.He said that the roads around the temple are jammed with potholes and badly done patchwork.The pothole filling operation was postponed due to continuous rain, according to Kolhapur city chief engineer Netradip Sarnobat.With the aid of crushed stone and tar, the municipal body has begun with the patchwork of the potholes.

According to district collector Rahul Rekhawar, visitors from outside Kolhapur were welcomed by tying Kolhapuri Pheta, an Oti, and a calendar with the image of Goddess Mahalaxmi were distributed.On Monday, a local transportation service was launched in the form of a Nav-Durga Darshan bus service, which would take devotees to nine Durga temples located at nine locations throughout the city.At Shahu Khasbaug's maidan bus stop, a separate inquiry and pass booking system has been created.This bus service will be available until October 4th, according to district guardian minister Deepak Kesarkar and chairman of state planning commission Rajesh Kshirsagar, who also introduced a free rickshaw service for tourist devotees.

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