Congress is greatly relieved by the victory in Himachal after several defeats.

Congress lost in Gujarat two days after registering the most poor results in the MCD election in the capital . BJP secured 156 seats in the state, breaking the record set by Congress, which took 149 seats in the 1985 poll .

New Delhi, December 8, 2018: The victory in Himachal Pradesh assembly polls came as a great relief to Congress, which had suffered a big blow in assembly elections in five states earlier this year, including the restoration of the old pension scheme and a pledge of Rs 1,500 to women and free electricity of 300 units.However, its vote share was 43.78%, very close to 42.99 per cent of the BJP, and several seats in the hill state have narrow margins, with rebels being a deciding factor.The Congress hyper-local or micro campaign in Gujarat failed to produce results and it was apparent that it made it possible for the BJP to return to power with a remarkable victory.The BJP secured 156 seats in the state, breaking the record set by Congress, which took 149 seats in the 1985 poll.

In the face of high-pitched campaigns by the BJP and the AAP, the Congress' campaign scheme was unpopular.In this election, Congress vote share has declined from 41.4% to 27.28 percent, a steep decrease of about 14%.BJP and AAP, on the other hand, have increased their vote counts.AAP, which made its way into the Gujarat assembly with five seats, is now a national party with a significant 12.92 percent vote share in Gujarat.

Like Himalayan Pradesh, which has seen alternate governments for many years, the Congress also had high hopes of removing Uttarakhand from the BJP earlier this year.The BJP's inept leadership, however, allowed the party to win a second term in office in the hill state.The Congress has been widely portrayed as having bungled its decisions in Punjab, where it was in power and had promising prospects before the February elections this year.In the assembly elections held earlier this year in Goa and Manipur, it was also on the right side of anti-incumbency.The Congress now has a difficult job of deciding an acceptable face among its oppositional ambitions in Himalayan Pradesh, not having had a chief ministerial face in the state.

The verdict in Himachal Pradesh was seen as a morale booster and the promises made to the state's people would be fulfilled, according to party leaders, who also expressed disappointment with the result in Gujarat, a state-run democracy with a three-party structure.Our voteshare gives us hope and determination for recovery and revival.We are the only alternative in Gujarat, party leader Jairam Ramesh said in a tweet.Himachal Pradesh has chosen its slogan of compassion over hate, according to Congress general secretary KC Venugopal, who said in tweets that the unholy relationship between AAP and BJP was instrumental in splitting the secular votes in order to produce the saffron victory.

Although Rahul Gandhi addressed two rallies in Himachal Pradesh, he did not address any rally in Himachal Pradesh.In a tweet, Rahul Gandhi said that the party accepts the verdict in Gujarat and that it will reorganize itself and strive to advocate for the interests of the state and the nation.The Congress lost in Gujarat two days after registering the most poor results in the MCD election in the capital.These are the first election results for the current party leader, Mallikarjun Kharge.

A sensible choice would be crucial to the government's stability.In Karnataka, Telangana, Chhattisgarh, Rajasthan, Rajasthan, and Madhya Pradesh, the Congress will face major challenges in next year's elections.Although it is in power in Chhattisgarh and Rajasthan, the BJP is in power in Karnataka and wants to dramatically expand in Telangana.Gujarat's results also highlight the faultlines in opposition that could give the BJP a leg up in the forthcoming polls.

Between the two opposition parties, as well as the dividing of votes, will put the opposition unity in jeopardy ahead of the 2024 Lok Sabha elections, where Congress is determined to lead the race.

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