DCPCR requests that NCERT change or replace the class nine English textbook because it normalises violent masculinity.

NCERT has requested that a class IX English textbook be modified or improved . The chapter titled The Little Girl tells the story of a girl named Kezia, who is afraid of her father .

The chapter titled The Little Girl tells the story of a girl named Kezia, who is afraid of her father.Image source: shutterstock.com New Delhi: NCERT has requested that a class IX English textbook be modified or improved, claiming that it normalizes violent masculinity, depicts women in stereotypical ways, and encourages children to deal with violence at home.The chapter titled The Little Girl, according to the panel's chairman Anurag Kundu, narrates the story of a girl Kezia, who is afraid of her father and is surrounded by him to the point where it affects her speech.Kundu wrote to @ncert Director John Mayer in a tweet that he had written to advise the removal of the chapter 3 titled The Little Girl of class IX English textbook because it normalizes violent masculinity, perpetuates patriarchy, and promotes toxic behavior in the family.

Kezias grandmother tells her that since her father's birthday is approaching, she wants to prepare a present for her mother.She prepares a pin cushion but then stuffs it with papers that contain a speech her father is supposed to make at an event.When the father discovers it, she is beaten up, but the grandmother insists that she forget the assault.Kezia learns that her father is too cynical about her to be with her at night, because he isn't sleeping with her, leading to him becoming tense.

The commission said it had sought input from gender experts about the book and found it to be extremely problematic.According to the article, Kezia's grandmother and mother are depicted in stereotypical ways.Both women are docile, unable to stand up to the father as he beats or screams at Kezia.The mother is shown as a facilitator of domestic violence and patriarchy in the household.

The letter to NCERT director showed her grandmother, who is an older relative, as unmarried in front of her son.The panel concluded that this portrayal of women is incompatible with the ideal gender equal society that we all dream of creating, and that children should be exposed to more realistic portrayals, allowing them to question and critically examine themselves.Because the father works too hard, it causes children to accept abuse at home.The material does not empower girls in any way, and in fact, it provides inflammatory examples in which girls and young women can forgive perpetrators of violence, while boys can learn that even if they are aggressive, they will be forgiven.

As young people grow up, Kundu emphasized that textbooks play an important role in informing young minds by exposing the concepts of misogyny and violence.To this end, chapters like this are a self-defeating exercise.I therefore request your generosity to either rewrite the chapter in a more appropriate manner or substitute it with a chapter from the textbook for the 2023-24 academic year from now, he said.

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