Delhi University hosts a programme on the role of tribal heroes in the struggle for freedom.

University of Delhi and National Commission for Scheduled Tribes launched conference on Tribal Heroes Contribution to the Freedom Struggle . Harsh Chauhan, the chairman of the NCST, was the chief guest .

On the occasion of Azadi ka Amrit Mahotsava, the University of Delhi (UoD) and the National Commission for Scheduled Tribes (NCST) have jointly launched a conference on Tribal Heroes Contribution to the Freedom Struggle.Harsh Chauhan, the chairman of the NCST, was the chief guest, and Anant Nayak, the NCST member, was present as the special guest.Professor Yogesh Singh, the Vice-Chancellor of DU, presided over the program.Suggested use: Browse the list of colleges and universities accepting the CUET 2022 Examine.Free Download!

Check It Out NowAlso See the DU Admissions Process.Read More Mr Chouhan said that India's tribal community image and reality were split in a big way.In addition, initiatives like this would help to illuminate the important function that the tribals played in Indian history in order to educate people about them and their perceptions.Also read: DU Announces Fee Waiver Program For Students With a Fiscally Poor Background Satyendra Singh, Vice President of Akhil Bharatiya Vanvasi Kalyan Ashram, emphasized on the contributions of notable tribal revolutionary activists like Birsa Munda, Tilkamanjhi, Rani Chennamma, BhimaNayak, Chakra Bisoi, Sidhu, and KanhuMurmu, among He underscored the importance of remembering the contributions of these unsung heroes.

The role of the tribal community in Indian history can be traced back to the time of Ramayana and Mahabharata, according to Ananta Nayak.Also read: University of Delhi: Prof. Yogesh Singh of Kerala insists that programs like this be implemented in universities.It informs us about our unsung heroes who gave their lives for us, and the best we can do is to honor them and be inspired by their lives, he said.Also, a video detailing the challenges faced by tribal communities in recent years was shown, as well as the role of NCST in mobilizing them.

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