Detecting workplace stress while monitoring privacy

Researchers found that personal sensing data may improve surveillance and relief of pain among resident physicians . Privacy questions regarding who sees the data and for what purposes must be addressed .

Washington, United States, November 25, : According to collaborative study by Cornell Tech, personal sensing data may improve surveillance and relief of pain among resident physicians, but privacy questions regarding who sees the data and for what purposes must be addressed.Burnout in all kinds of workplaces is on the rise in the United States, where the terms Great Resignation and silent quitting have come to prominence in recent years.This is especially true in the health care industry, which has been burdened beyond measure by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the use of smartphones, wearables, and personal computers has shown the severity of anxiety.However, data collection and analysis, as well as the larger questions of who should have access to such information and why, has inspired researchers to talk to those actual workers, according to Daniel Adler, co-lead author of Burnout and the Quantified Workplace: Tensions Around Personal Sensing Interventions for Stress in Resident Physicians, published in the ACM Proceedings on Human-Computer Interaction on Nov. 11-22.

That could blur the lines between the two.Tseng argued that it's a new context.We don't exactly know where the actual boundaries are or what it looks like to implement these new technologies.To see if this information flow is legitimate in the first place, you must try and determine what those guidelines are, and that is where this research was conducted.Choudhury and her team investigated these questions in a study involving resident physicians at an urban hospital in New York City.

They were also interested in the privacy issue, she said, and how we could use technologies like this to achieve those positive outcomes while still balancing privacy concerns.The study included two distinct use cases: self-reflection, in which the residents examine their own behavioral data, and data sharing, in which the same information is shared with their attendings and program directors for purposes of intervention.There is also a issue of anonymity, which was more likely with more involvement.However, greater participation would jeopardize the program's overall success because supervisors would be unable to determine which residents were struggling, Adler said.

Its not as simple as saying, They are my doctor, so I'm comfortable sharing this information.The authors conclude by stressing the urgent need for new strategies for business wellness management that better serve workers and provide security for the workers they want to support.

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