Experts during a WOTR webinar stated that successful Farmer Producer Organizations are those who look beyond the goal of profits.

Farmer Producer Organisations (FPOs) are gaining traction because of their benefits and funding to farmers . FPOs success is limited by accessing human resources, financial and technical assistance, knowing markets, and capacity building .

(PRNewswire) Pune (Maharashtra), November 25, (PRNewswire): Practitioners and experts met in a webinar on Friday, November 25, to discuss emerging challenges and opportunities related to Farmer Producer Organisations (FPOs), as well as organizations that support the FPO's operations.WOTR (Watershed Organisation Trust) led the way in establishing the ECOBARI project, which is backed by Honeywell Hometown Solutions India Foundation (HHSIF), and the event was held in India.Experts discussed the importance of ecosystem-based approaches during the webinar on Tuesday, saying, We hope that FPOs can bridge the gap between the need for stable incomes and supporting the sustainability of the ecosystem.Despite the fact that farmers and buyers are no longer related to the objective of member income, NABARD's Ex-CGM talked about the challenges that FPOs face at the start.

However, FPOs face a slew of challenges.FPOs' success is limited by accessing human resources, financial and technical assistance, knowing markets, and capacity building.The three success stories, authored by Vilas Shinde, Chairman of Sahyadri Farms, Krishna Prasad, Director of Sahaja Samrudha, and Anita Malage, Chairperson of Yashaswini Agro Producer Company, provided evidence-based solutions to many of the challenges faced by FPOs around India.These FPOs were able to succeed by diversification in terms of crops grown and products that are sold.To help mitigate risks posed by climate change and price volatility, Sahyadri Farms has expanded their production to include 27 varieties of grapes and 8 other horticulture crops.

Sahaja Samrudha CEO, Somesh, highlighted the challenges faced by them in the first four years to grasp market dynamics before they could become profitable, adding that Somesh said that today, Sahaja Samrudha is in a position to offer farmers a higher price for their products, as well as a share of the profits generated by our marketing efforts.Ms Anita Malage shared an inspiring story about how her 1,400 female farmers and shareholders treat a variety of crops, including tur, jowar, channa, vegetables and fruits.Balakrishnan S (CEO of Vrutti) and Sridhar Easwaran (Head, Samunnati Foundation) moderated a panel discussion that covered the diverse leadership achievements of her organization, such as building toilets under the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan and providing skill development assistance to women in non-agri-related fields such as setting up a beauty parlour, fashion designing, computer literacy, etc.FPOs were encouraged Vrutti urged FPOs to have at least two to three income sources, particularly by including a mixed crop-livestock approach that also brings in income from dairy, according to Balakrishnan.

Emmanuel Murray, Managing Director of Caspian Equity, summing up the discussions and reflecting on the earlier presentations, explained how crucial it was that new FPOs have an anchor person who can lead the company forward.Murray said that successful FPOs have also been those that look beyond the scope of profit and have adopted a regional growth perspective and sustainable agricultural practices, taking a long-term view.In his closing remarks, Srinivasan said that the FPOs are the new age organisations that will best serve the interests of small holder farmers.To thrive and prosper, FPOs must focus on member relationships that foster loyalty, robust procurement and pricing schemes for aggregation, the ability to take business decisions, including financial ones, digitalisation for easy account and record keeping, and a constant search for greater value for members.

ECOBARI's objective is to enable communities to sustainably regenerate and manage their ecosystems, protect biodiversity, grow resilient livelihoods, and improve their quality of life by using nature-based and nature-positive strategies as they adapt to climate change.WOTR (Watershed Organisation Trust) is a worldwide recognized non-profit and think tank that promotes participatory watershed restoration and ecosystem restoration, climate resilient sustainable agriculture, integrated and efficient water management, and climate change adaptation.It has its headquarters in Pune, Maharashtra, India.WOTR and its associates have worked in ten states, 5,592 villages, served > 4.78 million people; assisted 607,000 people (including from 63 countries); organized over 230 NGOs PIAs; and supported nearly 16,000 SHGs involving approximately 200,000 women.

In the majority of the project villages, agricultural incomes are 2 to 4 times more than those in the control villages.

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