Following WSN's declaration that monkeypox is a pandemic, WHO is likely to refer to it as a global emergency.

The number of confirmed monkeypox cases in the world has surpassed 3,200 . The new monkeypox epidemic, which began in May, has spanned almost 1,500 cases in Central Africa this year .

The number of confirmed monkeypox cases in the world has surpassed 3,200, according to World Health Organization (WHO).One man has also been convicted of the virus, according to WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, who noted that the infection was affecting men who have sex with men.Tedros said that human borne diseases are prevalent and that they are likely underestimated.What is a global health crisis The International Health Regulations Emergency Committee is meeting to determine whether or not monkeypox is a global health emergency.

The new monkeypox epidemic, which began in May, has spanned almost 1,500 cases in Central Africa this year, with 70 deaths, according to Tedros.Earlier, the World Health Network (WHN), a worldwide alliance of scientific and citizen teams, declared it a pandemic.The WHN said in a statement that there are now 3,417 confirmed monkeypox cases documented in 58 countries, and that if no international response is taken to curb the epidemic's progression, millions of people will die and many are blind and disabled, according to Eric Feigl-Ding, PhD, Epidemiologist and Health Economist and co-founder of WHN.There is no excuse to wait for the monkeypox epidemic to increase exponentially.

Any extension only makes the task more difficult and the consequences more severe, according to Yaneer Bar-Yam, PhD, President of the New England Complex Systems Institute and co-founder of WHN.Evidence of local transmission of monkeypox As a result, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that there are signs of local transmission of monkeypox, as well as cases reported in people who have traveled abroad.The cases are mainly affecting men who have sexual relations with other men, but women are also getting infected, according to CDC staff member Dr. Agam Rao.