Former Afghan Vice President Saleh accuses Pakistani services of trying to kill him twice.

Twitter has received a letter from Pakistani law enforcement about Amrullah Saleh's account . Saleh said that these shocking attacks killed 60 people, including the Pakistan Army .

Kabul (Afghanistan), August 6: Former Vice President Amrullah Saleh blasted Pakistani officials for participating in at least two assassination attempts against him on Saturday.Saleh said that these shocking attacks killed 60 people, including the Pakistan Army, who has begun to ramp up cyber-terrorism by threatening Twitter to ban him from social media platforms.Now, the GHQ has begun to ramp up cyber terrorism as well.The Afghan resistance leader told Twitter that his ego hasn't fully satisfied, according to Saleh.We're writing to inform you that Twitter has received a letter from Pakistani law enforcement about your Twitter account, @Amrullah5aleh2, in which he states that the following material violates the Pakistani law(s) of state.

Saleh should obtain legal counsel and contest the complaint in court, by contacting relevant civil society organizations, voluntarily deleting the file (if applicable), or finding a different solution, according to the social media website.Although Twitter is unable to provide legal advice, we want you to have an opportunity to consider the application and, if necessary, take the necessary steps to protect your rights, read the letter.In June, Human Rights Watch said Taliban security forces in northern Afghanistan's Panjshir province have illegally detained and tortured civilians accused of being affiliated with an opposition armed group.Thousands of fighters have been sent to the province by the Taliban, who have carried out search operations in favour of the NRF, according to the Taliban.Taliban forces in Panjshir province have resorted to beating civilians in their response to the opposition National Resistance Front, according to Patricia Gossman, associate Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

After several days, the Taliban released 70 people, but they have continued to hold ten people whose relatives they suspect are members of the organisation, a form of collective punishment, according to former detainees.According to former detainees, the district jail held almost 100 others who have alleged links to the NRF.None of them had access to their families or lawyers.Other people have been held in informal detention facilities.