If a person is not abused in public, the SC/ST Act cannot be used, says the Karnataka High Court

Rithesh Pias was charged with harassment by building owner Jayakumar R Nair . The High Court of Karnataka quashed the charges also, claiming that the conflict should result in harm caused by the dispute .

Bengaluru: The High Court of Karnataka has ruled that the hurling of casteist abuse in a public place must be forbidden under the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, which has quashed a lawsuit brought against a man after it was discovered that the alleged assault occurred in a basement of a building where the perpetrator and his co-workers were all present.According to the verdict issued by Justice M Nagaprasanna on June 10, two things will emerge: One being that the building's basement was not a place of public view, and two, the complainants and other Jayakumar R.Nair employees and their friends are the complainants, according to the court.Rithesh Pias is charged with harassment by building owner Jayakumar R Nair and had obtained a suspension against the building's construction, according to the judge.The issue of the conflict between the two can't be dismissed, as it shows a clear connection in the chain of events, according to the court.

Pias was charged with crimes under Section 323 (Voluntarily Causing Hurt) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) by the Sessions Court in Mangaluru, where the case was pending, the High Court dismissed the charges also, claiming that the conflict should result in harm caused by the dispute.In this instance, however, the Mohans wound certificate reveals a single scratch on the forearm and another scratch on the chest.Bleeding is not indicated.Hence, simple scratch marks cannot be a crime under Section 323 of the IPC, the court ruled.