Iran is the subject of a human rights investigation by the UN

UN High Commissioner outlined how the security forces, particularly the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and Basij forces, have used live ammunition, birdshots, and other metal pellets, teargas, and batons against the demonstration movement . The Council took up the term fortress mentality of those who wield power in Iran .

Geneva, Switzerland, November 25: The Human Rights Council has launched a fact-finding mission in response to the demonstrations in Iran that started in mid-September and now spanned the region, according to UN News.Turk called for an independent probe, and the Council took up the term fortress mentality of those who wield power in Iran.To see what's going on in the world, he told the packed chamber.The photographs of children who were killed are disturbing.

Of people sentenced to death.The UN High Commissioner outlined how the security forces, particularly the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and Basij forces, have used live ammunition, birdshots, and other metal pellets, teargas, and batons against the demonstration movement, which has spanned 150 cities and 140 universities in all Iran's provinces.Before calling for an independent probe into all suspected rights abuses, the High Commissioner stated that Iran had received numerous emails about the incident, including domestic probes.Since the death of Aminis, Iran's representative, Khadijeh Karimi, Deputy Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, said that these attempts failed to meet international requirements of impartiality, freedom, and transparency.

The situation in Piranshahr, Javanrood, and Mahabad, according to him, has been troubling.According to him, the Iranian government has regularly presented unsubstantiated findings and reiterated assertions that Jina Mahsa did not die as a result of abuse or beatings.According to the most recent UN human rights office reports, the government has denied killings of children by security forces, claiming they committed suicide, fell from a height, were poisoned, or killed by anonymous enemy agents.According to the most recent UN human rights office reports, more than 300 people have been killed in demonstrations, including at least 40 children.

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