Karnataka's Private Schools Strive To Write Their Own Textbooks

Private schools in Karnataka petitioned the High Court of Karnataka . Petition challenging the Karnataka Education Act, 1983, has been reserved for judgment .

Bengaluru: A petition challenging the Karnataka Education Act, 1983, has been reserved for judgment by the High Court of Karnataka.The laws in question include a provision for the appointment of students in unaided schools as well as the State's curriculum.After the government refused to address any questions, the High Court reserved the case for judgment on Thursday.Private schools in Karnataka have petitioned the High Court of Karnataka, seeking, among other things, permission to write textbooks on their own.

In this regard, the Karnataka Education Act, 1983, has been amended.KUSMA has also challenged other sections of the Karnataka Education Act, including Section 5 read with Section 41(3), which dictates that reservations be made in the event of selection of teaching and non-teaching staff in private unaided schools.The stipulation in this section has been deemed unconstitutional by the Government.The petition also asks the state government not to enforce the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education, which allows students from poorer sections of the population and marginalized populations to reserve seats in private unaided schools.

According to the petition, private unaided educational institutions should be able to determine a realistic fee structure and not be subjected to a rigid and stereotypical fee structure imposed by the government.On Thursday, the petition was moved to the division bench of Justice Alok Aradhe and Justice Vishwajit Shetty.K V Dhananjay, a KUSMA advocate, referred to the latest controversy surrounding Savarkar in Karnataka government text books.He also cited the 1984 Sikh riots, saying that even Sikh schools cannot teach them.

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