Make Amazon Pay Protests Threaten Black Friday Sales in 40 Countries

Thousands of Amazon warehouse workers in around 40 countries are organizing demonstrations and walkouts to commemorate Black Friday sales . Organizers say they are protesting for better pay and working conditions .

Thousands of Amazon warehouse workers in around 40 countries are organizing demonstrations and walkouts to commemorate Black Friday sales, the year's biggest online shopping day, in a campaign dubbed Make Amazon Pay.Employees in the United States, the United Kingdom, India, Japan, Australia, South Africa, and across Europe are protesting for better pay and working conditions, according to Christy Hoffman, general secretary of UNI Global Union, one of the campaign's organizers.Workers at a warehouse in Staten Island, New York, voted to join a start-up earlier this year, citing Amazon's goal to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2040 and that the company's continued to provide competitive wages and excellent benefits while also working on new ways to keep our workers safe and healthy, according to Amazon spokesman David Nieberg.It does not differentiate between workers who are elderly or have a restricted mobility.Workers stay up at night staring solely at their productivity numbers, she advised European leaders to improve labour rights across the bloc.

Between Nov. 22 and Dec. 24, workers must make sure they don't take an unsafe absence.According to the GMB, linking payments to attendance could be misinterpreted as unlawful compulsion not to strike in more than ten cities, as well as outside an apartment block on 5th Avenue in New York, where Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has a condo.Multiple protests are also planned in India, and members of a newly formed alliance in Japan will demonstrate outside the company's national headquarters in Tokyo.In Bangladesh, garment workers in Amazon's supply chain will march in Dhaka and Chittagong.Also in Ireland, protesters will gather outside the company's Dublin offices to protest two new data centers in the city.

Amazon warned that the coming Christmas season might not be as busy as it used to be.The company's decision to lay off 10,000 workers would also make wage negotiations more difficult, according to Laurent Cretin, a CFE-CGC union representative in France, who said the organization will have 880 workers in a Chalon-sur-Saone warehouse this Christmas season, down from 1,000 before Covid, and that he said it would be as successful as last year, which saw a post-Covid boost.

.
.
.
.