NGO attempting to alter public view of J&K: Author

The JK Policy Institute is a grassroots group in its third year of existence . The group aims to rebuild Kashmir's image .

Washington, D.C., December 8: The latest example is of how a global media coverage of Kashmir is spreading misinformation, inaccurate and biased reports, but Victoria Jones writes in the Diplomatic Courier that a non-governmental organisation exists that can point it out on a map and only care about the area during the 1990s' invasion, or the period after the removal of Article 370.In addition, she is the chief editor of INTERZINE, a digital media platform that contextualizes current global issues.The JK Policy Institute, a burgeoning grassroots group in its third year of existence, is aiming to rebuild that image.This can mean bringing attention to local telecommunications initiatives, such as the construction of roads, and tying them to regional economic development.They also refer to climate issues, such as flooding in 2014, which is unfortunately all too relevant in Pakistan, saying that these issues are not being adequately addressed through a conflict lens and citing their effect on the political economy.

JKPI also has a specific initiative dedicated to raising money and assisting in the integration of the LGBTQ community into a wider community.According to one of JKPI's members, the removal of Article 370 has sparked greater opportunity for the region's social and economic growth by providing training and organizing skill-based workshops, since they have trouble obtaining jobs and are often only able to get jobs entertaining at weddings due to the high stigma they face.He said he isn't a fan of Narendra Modi or the Bharatiya Janata Party, but that he favors the abrogation of Article 370, making it a point to distinguish the two groups and their agendas.Security in the region is also improving and is also receiving government assistance because people are seeing the progress and reaping the benefits.

Whatever the motive, violence is a distraction, JKPI members said, according to JKPI members.The city and the area are unexplored by its past.As a result of its own domestic crisis, Pakistan continues to fuel the rebellion, but less so recently than it had anticipated.JKPI also highlighted the existence of hit lists against NGO workers, who are targeted by malware from around the world, including Jammu and Kashmir itself, Pakistan, Europe, and the United States.

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