No Democracy's Institution, Not Even the College, Is Perfect, Chief Justice

Chief Justice of India D Y Chandrachud said that no institution in a constitutional democracy, including the collegium, is perfect . He said that putting good people in the judiciary and paying them high salaries would not improve the collegium system .

New Delhi (New Delhi): Chief Justice of India D Y Chandrachud said on Friday that no institution in a constitutional democracy, including the collegium, is perfect, and that the best way to achieve this is to work within the current system.To commemorate the Constituent Assembly's adoption of the Constitution in 1949, the Constituent Assembly has celebrated Constitution Day on November 26.The day was first observed as Law Day earlier this year, according to the CJI.On the subject of collegium, the CJI said: Finally, criticism of the collegium.

In a constitutional democracy, no system is perfect.However, we practice within the present constitutional structure as it is understood and given to us.We, all the collegium's judges, including me, are loyal soldiers who follow the Constitution.When we mention shortcomings, our approach is to work our way into the existing system.

Getting good people to join the judiciary, as well as good lawyers to join the judiciary, isn't limited to remaking the collegium.The degree to which you can be judges isn't a function of how much money you give them.Any higher you pay judges, it would be just a fraction of what a successful lawyer makes at the end of a life, according to the CJI, who said that becoming a judge isn't just about being kind, but also about being positive about people whose lives you may disagree with.It means knowing how a criminal becomes criminal.

Justice Chandrachud said that mentoring young people by giving them the opportunity to be judges is crucial to ensuring that our judiciary and the bar remain equal participants in the mission of providing justice to ordinary citizens, not just in terms of the important decisions that we give to the people, he said.He said that the legal profession needs to abandon its colonial roots and the strict dress code for our lawyers, particularly in summer, could be reformed.According to him, the tightening of clothing should not result in moral policing of woman lawyers, according to the article.Featured Video Of The DayArvind Kejriwal's Idea For Delhi's Garbage Collection is out now.

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