On January 17, the SC will hear the Maha government's appeal of Saibaba and others' acquittal in the Maoist connection case.

Maharashtra government challenging Bombay High Courts order discharged GN Saibaba and others in contested Maoist links lawsuit . The former Delhi University professor was acquitted of the lawsuit .

New Delhi, December 8 : The Supreme Court referred to a plea brought by the Maharashtra government challenging the Bombay High Court's October 14 order, which discharged former Delhi University professor GN Saibaba and others in a contested Maoist links lawsuit.A bench of Justices MR Shah and Hima Kohli, who is the Maharashtra government, told the court that the entire story on record, which included ten volumes, would be submitted within a week However, the accused will be free to apply for bail, according to the Supreme Court.The accused persons were not notified of their guilt at the hearing of Maharashtra's plea.The accused were found guilty by the trial court after a thorough examination of the evidence, and offences are severe, and they are serious against the society's sovereignty and integrity if the state wins on merit.

The High Court acquitted Saibaba and others in the lawsuit on the grounds that the order was unconstitutional and that certain information was submitted to the proper authority and sanction was granted on the same day, according to the secretary general.They were arrested in 2014 and released alongside a journalist and a JNU student.The court had not disclosed that the sanction for Saibabas' restitution was granted only after the trial began.For the other defendants, the High Court had found that the sanction order issued to prosecute them under the UAPA was flawed in theory and invalid.Apart from Saibaba, the High Court convicted Mahesh Kariman Tirki, Pandu Pora Narote, Hem Keshavdatta Mishra, and Prashant Sanglikar of life imprisonment, as well as Vijay Tirki, who was sentenced to ten years in prison.

They were accused of participating in activities relating to engaging in military operations.

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