Report: Researchers Launch Undersea Expedition to Search for 2014 Earth-Crashing Interstellar Meteor

A meteorite that may have originated from outside the solar system crashed into the Pacific Ocean in 2014 . Scientists have also launched an expedition to the depths of the ocean to look for the space rock .

In 2014, a meteorite that may have originated from outside the solar system crashed into the sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea.Scientists have also launched an expedition to the depths of the ocean to look for the space rock, since it is the third known object of its kind, according to a survey.The pther two, Oumuamua and Borisov, landed on the Earth in 2017 and 2018, according to the news outlet.These are the first known interstellar objects.

The meteor was the first to recognize its possible interstellar origins, which they named CNEOS 2014-01-08.They arrived at this conclusion by analyzing the trajectory of the half-metre-wide object; its remarkably high heliocentric velocity suggests that it was not attracted to the energy of our Sun, however, the scientific community refused to officially designate CNEOS 2014-01-08 as an interstellar object due to a lack of information.This was the case because the data used to calculate the meteor's impact on Earth was collected by a US Department of Defense satellite.According to scientists, the meteorite is just a little bit larger than a microwave.

Nevertheless, a report by the US Space Command on April 7th confirmed the meteor's interstellar behavior.According to the researchers, the majority of the surviving fragments destroyed once they reached the Earth's atmosphere, and they plummeted into the Pacific Oceans depths.