Researchers investigate how me-time affects social engagement.

Study found that those who seek solitude for an escape from stress or unpleasant social situations may not find it satisfying . Findings were published in an special issue of solitude in the International Journal of Behavioral Development .

Washington, D.C., December 10: While many emerging adults find social interactions satisfying on days when spending more time alone is common, those who seek solitude for an escape from stress or unpleasant social situations may not.The findings were published in an special issue of solitude in the International Journal of Behavioral Development, which was published in a special issue on solitude.Previous studies indicate that spending too much time alone has negative consequences, such as loneliness and emotional distress.Other studies have attributed solitude to reduced anxiety, fear, and regret, but this investigation explored how spending time alone has an effect on how people feel about interactions with others on the same day, and whether this effect comes about the reasons why someone sought solitude in the first place, according to Hope White, a graduate student at UB's psychology department and the study's first author.

Instead, they may spend their free time ruminating.The novel research provides new insights into the dangers and rewards of solitude in emerging adulthood, which is characterized by a new freedom to decide how and with whom one spends their time, among a diverse group of 411 emerging adults aged 18-26.Participants completed regular reports on their smartphones about how much time they spent alone and how they felt after social interaction occurred.This novel approach allowed the researchers to assess changes in time spent alone in order to determine the effect of more time in solitude on social relationships, according to Julie Bowker, PhD, associate professor of psychology at the UB College of Arts and Sciences, and one of the papers' co-authors.

People could benefit from guidance on how to best use extra time alone to help them both individually and in their interactions with others, according to White.Further studies are needed, according to White.Our study takes the field forward, but there is still a lot to learn about this simple everyday life event.

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