Strong guts help professional athletes perform better, according to research

Researchers from all around the UK studied the fitness and gut health of a group of well-matched, highly trained endurance runners to see how high-protein and high-carbohydrate diets might have an effect on the gut microbiome . During time trials, participants whose gut microbiome was more stable performed better .

Washington, D.C., August 6: According to a new report, microbial contamination in the gut can affect elite endurance runners' fitness, and that short-term, high-protein diets are linked to this phenomenon.Researchers from all around the UK studied the fitness and gut health of a group of well-matched, highly trained endurance runners to see how high-protein and high-carbohydrate diets might have an effect on the gut microbiome.This was also accompanied by a 23.3 percent decrease in time trial effectiveness.The analysis revealed that there was a significantly reduced diversity and altered structure of the gut phagosome, as well as higher levels of certain types of virals and bacterial compartments.

Since there is cross-talk between the gut and the brain, the researchers argue that this might be relevant.Patients who followed a high-carbohydrate diet received an improved time trial success of 6.5 percent, according to Associate Professor in Health and Exercise Nutrition at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), who is co-author of the report.These results indicate that athletic performance may be correlated with gut microbial stability, because athletes with more stable microbial communities performed better in each diet intervention compared to those with more unstable gut microbiota, according to Dr Justin Roberts.These results suggest that Rather, we suspect that the changes in the gut microbiome can affect intestinal permeability or nutrient absorption, or the messages between the gut and the brain, affecting perceived exertion and consequent performance, according to Dr Justin.