Study finds negative impacts of air pollution in kids.

Researchers examined blood samples from more than 100 healthy children aged 9-11 in the Sacramento area, where the EPA records pollutants near their homes . Exposure to pollutants produced during wildfires has been linked to numerous undesirable health outcomes in children with smaller bodies and organ systems than adults .

Washington, United States, August 7: New research has shown that air pollution exposure among children has led to elevated levels of inflammation, such as interleukin 6.According to the study, higher air pollution is related to poor cardiac autonomic control in children, which affects how quickly the heart beats and how hard it pumps.Researchers examined blood samples from more than 100 healthy children aged 9-11 in the Sacramento area, where the EPA records pollutants near their homes.Anna M. Parenteau, a doctoral student, and Camelia E. Hostinar, an associate professor, all of the UC Davis Department of Psychology, wrote the paper.

Researchers examined fine particulate matter data from the EPA (PM2.5) to see if fine particles that can penetrate the lungs and pass into the bloodstream in children's blood revealed signs of systemic inflammation.PM2.5, which stands for particulate matter that measures 2.5 micrometres or less per EPA, was linked to reduced cardiac autonomic regulation measured using an electrocardiogram.Researchers used data files maintained by the EPA, which contain daily air quality summary results from each outdoor monitor in the region.In total, 27 of the children examined had inflammation markers in their blood, as a result of fires in which they encountered high levels of PM2.5 in the air.

The findings were similar to those obtained in a previous study, in which the blood of young primates was collected by UC Davis researchers after large wildfires, and this report further illustrates the immediate consequences of air pollution, which may raise the risk of future disease, according to Parenteau.Moreover, Parenteau explained that as climate change continues to affect children and families, it is important to understand the impact of environmental contaminants like air pollution on their physiology, according to previous studies.Researchers also found that children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of air pollution because they have a higher intake of pollutants and a greater lung surface area than adults.Researchers concluded that continuing research on environmental pollutants can raise the alarm about the effects of air pollution and inform policy changes that could improve long-term population health.