Swimming ability gaps by race and ethnicity persist through generations: survey

Less African and Latine children took swimming lessons than White children, study finds . CDC: Increasing access to swimming pools and affordable, culturally tailored water safety programs are crucial strategies to reduce racial disparities in child drownings .

Washington, December 11: During a parent survey conducted by Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, researchers discovered significant racial and ethnic differences in swimming abilities.The findings were published in the journal Pediatrics.Less than 25% of parents who identified themselves as Latine (less than 25 percent) and Black (28 percent) than White parents (56 percent).In comparison to nearly 60% of White parents, less than 33% of Black parents and less than 40% of Latine parents confirmed their children's swimming ability.

Less African and Latine children took swimming lessons, according to senior author Michelle Macy, MD, MS, Emergency Medicine physician at Lurie Childrens and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, than White children (46%, 47%, and 72%, respectively).We must address swim comfort and skills for both parents and their children, he said.According to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), increasing access to swimming pools and affordable, culturally tailored water safety programs are crucial strategies to reduce racial disparities in child drownings.According to the latest results, Black children ages 10-14 years drown at rates that are 7 times higher than White children.

Dr Macy and colleagues searched the responses of 1,283 parents of 2,148 children aged 4 years and older.Participants represented Chicago's racial and ethnic diversity.The research at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital of Chicago is conducted by the Stanley Manne Childrens Research Institute.The Manne Research Institute is dedicated to improving infant health, transforming pediatric medicine, and ensuring happier lives through relentless inquiry.

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine's pediatric training facility is based there.The Grainger Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine conducts primary care at Lurie Childrens.

.
.
.
.