Taliban defends executions in public and claims that punishment is a religious mandate.

Taliban Supreme Courts executed a man convicted of murder for the first time since they took over Afghanistan last year . The Taliban said the execution was carried out after a variety of tests, which was also a divine command .

Kabul, Afghanistan, December 9, : The Taliban said the execution was carried out after a variety of tests, which was also a divine command, according to Bilal Karimi, the Islamic Emirates' spokesperson.According to TOLONews, both sides should have no reservations in this regard and should respect it.We had fought for 20 years with the pagans to establish an Islamic system and that now that God has given us, (God) wants us to honor his divine commands, according to Mohammad Ismail Rahmani, a senior member of Afghanistan's interim government.The Taliban Supreme Court's decision comes a day after publicly executing a man convicted of murder for the first time since they took over Afghanistan last year.Talibans spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said the man had been killed in public.According to a Voice of America (VOA) News story, Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid said that the execution took place in a sports stadium in western Farah province on Wednesday.

Following the execution, the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan endorsed the plan and tweeted, The United Nations accepts the death penalty in all circumstances and urges de facto authorities to initiate an immediate moratorium with the intention of abolishing it, according to Aziz Maarij, a retired diplomat.According to the jail spokesperson, the executed individual confessed to stabbing to death a Farah resident and taking his belongings, including a motorcycle, according to VOA.The Taliban has also been chastised by the US after reports of public execution emerged.Weve seen reports that the Taliban has ordered judges to carry out their interpretation of Sharia law, according to US State Department Spokesperson Ned Price.

The Taliban aims to return to their regressive and inflammatory practices of the 1990s, according to this report.It was an affront to the dignity and human rights of all Afghans then; it would be an affront to the dignity and human rights of all Afghans today.

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