The only remaining option is that: Legal expert on Nirav Modis's appeal against extradition

Nirav Modi is the prime suspect in the Rs 13,500 crore PNB saga . He is wanted in India to face money laundering and fraud charges .

New Delhi, November 24: According to a legal expert, Nirav Modi, a fugitive diamond merchantman wanted to prevent his extradition to India by requesting permission to appeal his order in the country's top court, two weeks after a UK court denied his extradition request back to India.Before he goes to the Supreme Court, he will need permission from the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom to reach a decision on the grounds that the problem is of utmost importance to society.He will then go to the Supreme Court, which would take him 14 days, according to counsel Arpit Batra.The grounds are valid, said the lawyer, but the extradition court in the United Kingdom, as well as the High Court, had boldly stated in their order sheets that he may be suffering from a suicide problem or he may be in depression, but the threshold is not such that sending him to India would be unfair.

In any case, his current orders are in jeopardy.He has been in jail for a long time.The next step was to sue, according to his counsel.Once the appeal is dismissed by the supreme court, Nirav Modi will petition the European Court of Human Rights.Following Brexit, the European court may also hear the case.

The High Court of London (United Kingdom) dismissed Nirav Modi's appeal, which is wanted in India to face money laundering and fraud charges.The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) later accepted the Supreme Court's decision to refuse Nirav's appeal.India has been pursuing the extradition of economic fugitives to ensure that they are brought to justice in India.The decision of the UK High Court is welcome.During a press conference, MEA spokesperson Arindam Bagchi said that we want to bring him to India as soon as possible.

He was thrown out of jail after being asked to enter the High Court in London for extradition on mental health grounds, according to the High Court's bench of Justice Stuart Smith and Justice Robert Jay.Nirav Modi's counsel stated that he would die by suicide due to severe depression and that he is neither at the highest level nor is he at the most threatening end of the spectrum of depressive disorders.Although he has maintained suicidal thoughts, he has neither attempted suicide or deliberate suicide nor revealed plans to do so, according to the High Court, the Government of India had sought the appellant, Nirav Deepak Modi, last year.The Court noted that the British High Court had ruled in favour of extradition.He is currently serving time in Wandsworth Prison, southeast London.

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