The Supreme Court will change the abortion law to make it the same for single women.

The Supreme Court will examine the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act and related laws to see if unmarried women can be allowed to abort a 24-week pregnancy on medical advice . The parliamentary policy seems to be straightforward, since it has replaced husband with wife .

New Delhi: After finding that refusing an unmarried woman the right to safe abortion violates her personal autonomy, the Supreme Court will now examine the Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP) Act and the related laws to see if unmarried women can be allowed to abort a 24-week pregnancy on medical advice.The parliamentary policy seems to be straightforward, since it has replaced husband with wife.It shows that they have classified unmarried women as individuals who are allowed to terminate 24-week pregnancy, according to Justice Chandrachud.The bench said it needs to structure its conclusion in such a way that unmarried women are also allowed to terminate their 24-week pregnancy, as did divorced women, widows, or those in judicial separation.

Mr Bhati said that abortion at 24 weeks carries a significant risk and that it can even end the lives of the women, and that the bench asked her for advice on the matter.The MTP Act was extended to include unmarried women on July 21 and allowed the 25-year-old to abort her 24-week pregnancy arising out of a consensual marriage.This Court has acknowledged live-in relationships, and it said that the AIIMS, Delhi, had directed the director of the hospital to establish a medical board in accordance with the MTP Act's provisions, and that the petitioner should not be barred from receiving the benefit because she is an unmarried woman, according to the court.The petitioner also requested that the Court reconsider her decision by deciding that the statute's provisions, Explanation 1 to Section 3, apply to the main purpose and The Supreme Court argued that the delay in the judicial process did not lead to her dissatisfaction with the MTP Act of 2021, which included the substitution of the word husband with partner.Unfortunately, it noted that although Section 3 extends beyond traditional marriages, it considers other kinds of women, including divorced women, widows, children, mentally ill women, and survivors of sexual harassment or rape.