The Supreme Court's ruling in a case challenging religious procession

The Supreme Court dismissed a PIL filed by an NGO for framing of rules on religious ceremonies, brandishing swords and rifles . The bench noted that the legislation on procession permissions is current but that no body except the Supreme Court is equipped to deal with the national issue .

The Supreme Court dismissed a PIL filed by an NGO for framing of rules on religious ceremonies, brandishing swords and rifles, and the assignment of permission by state administration, saying that in a diverse world as India, law and order is a state issue, and that aspects such as laying down the SOP (standard operating system) for grant of permission for religious processions are judicially manageable.During the brief hearing, lakhs of people gather in Maharashtra, but there are no demonstrations, according to senior advocate C U Singh, who represents the NGO.The bench noted that the legislation on procession permissions is current but that no body except the Supreme Court is equipped to deal with the national issue.The challenges from Kashmir to Kanyakumari are different.

These prayers aren't particularly pleasurable on the court.According to the bench, it seeks the roving writ of mandamus...The Supreme Court cannot be dragged into any area of law and order.The NGO's counsel then tried to withdraw the PIL, which the court rejected.

With these prayers, there is no withdrawal.The bench dismissed the application, which the bench concluded was denied.

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