The World Bank's toolbox aims to increase gender equality in public areas and transportation.

World Bank has released a toolkit on how to create gender-responsive urban mobility and public spaces in India . India has one of the world's lowest female labour force participation rates, at 22.8 percent, in 2019-20 .

Chennai (Tamil Nadu) (India), December 9: The World Bank has released a toolkit on how to create gender-responsive urban mobility and public spaces in India, with the intention of assisting Indian cities in implementing better public transportation that caters to the needs of women, according to the World Bank.This severely limits their ability to work, study, and live choices.According to the global lender, India has one of the world's lowest female labour force participation rates, at 22.8 percent, in 2019-20.The World Bank toolkit, released on Thursday and aimed specifically at Indian cities, recommends including a gender lens in current and proposed transport policies and plans.It also recommends embedding a gender lens in existing and future transportation policies and initiatives, such as urban local bodies and public transport authorities.

The study also recommended that there be adequate street lighting, improved bike paths, and more accessible transport for women who aren't using motorized vehicles.It said that lower fare schemes would raise ridership among women and people of other ages.According to Gerald Paul Ollivier, Director of Transport Specialist at the World Bank and co-author of the toolkit, setting up a robust grievance redressal system can help speed up sexual harassment allegations.Through a series of 50 case studies from around India and the rest of the world, the toolkit brings together lessons learned on the what and how, revealing practical steps that have worked.

According to the World Bank survey, 84% of these trips were planned to be by public transportation.How men and women travel is also intrinsically different.More women walk to work than women, 45.4 percent versus 27.4 percent.More women travel by bus and are likely to take into account cost when traveling.Since faster modes are more costly, they tend to use slower modes of transportation.

Men used two-wheelers to commute to work between 2004 and 2019, according to this survey, while women used auto-rickshaws or taxis, which are more expensive (per trip) than two-wheelers.The World Bank's toolkit contains practical tips for ensuring that women in India have clean and inclusive public spaces and public transportation.

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