There is no plan to bring NJAC: Kiren Rijiju to the legislature.

Rijiju said that the appointment of judges in the Constitutional Courts is a continuous, integrated, and collaborative process between the Executive and the Judiciary . Rijiju said that the Government has submitted a total of 256 proposals to the High Courts as on December 5, 2022 .

New Delhi, India, December 8: Minister of Justice Kiren Rijiju said on Thursday that there is no such plan to reintroduce the National Judicial Appointments Commission (NJAC) with appropriate changes.Rijiju said that the appointment of judges in the Constitutional Courts is a continuous, integrated, and collaborative process between the Executive and the Judiciary.Rijiju said that the Government has submitted a total of 256 proposals to the High Courts as on December 5, 2022, one proposal for the appointment of a Supreme Court Judge and eight proposals for the appointment of the High Court Judges that have been accepted by the Supreme Court Collegium are pending with the Government, he said.On the recommendation of the Supreme Court Collegium, the plans are remitted to the concerned High Courts, he said.On the subject of the number of vacancies in the Supreme Court and High Court as of December 5, 27 Judges are serving in the Supreme Court, leaving seven vacancies, he said.In the High Courts, against the sanctioned strength of 1108, 778 Judges are serving, leaving 330 vacancies, he said.

While hearing a complaint against the Centre for retaining the name Collegium recommended names of judges for their appointment in the various High Courts and Supreme Court pending, the court observed that parliament has the right to enact a regulation, but that it is subject to the scrutiny of the courts, and it is important that the statute followed by individuals who follow it.The court also observed that the Centre's recent decision to return names for a second time as part of its earlier policy.The court acknowledged that it was not aware of the particular circumstance in which this name was pulled.The Supreme Court also referred to a Supreme Court decision urging Union Ministers to exercise some degree of autonomy over their public criticism of the Collegium system, and that the ministers should exercise some degree of autonomy.The Supreme Court ruled that the current MOP is not final until it is decided, and that the Council has voted to keep the MOP.

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