Tolerance for other people's opinions does not imply acceptance of hate speech: Chandrachud, Justice

Supreme Court judge DY Chandrachud delivered commencement address to Gujarat National Law University . Advised students to be guided by their own conviction and equitable motive .

GANDHINAGAR: Being open and tolerant of others' viewpoints does not mean being tolerant of hate speech, according to Supreme Court judge DY Chandrachud here on Saturday.In his commencement address to Gujarat National Law University (GNLU), he advised the graduating students to be guided by their own conviction and equitable motive.In the age of social media with a short attention span, it is important to keep in mind that a lot of work we do will have a long-term effect, and that we shouldn't be concerned about every day distraction, he said in his address, which was delivered via video link.I disapprove of what you say, but I will fight to death to assert it, and the terms often associated with Voltaire must be integrated into our beings.

In the midst of the rising chaos and confusion of political, social, and moral divisions of the majority, students must be guided by the path of their own conscience and equitable reasons, he said at the 11th convocation of the GNLU.He also used the writer Seth Godins' metaphor of the current and the wind.The current will move the canoe much faster down the canal than the wind will.But the wind distracts us.... Our present frameworks of class, race, and gender, as well as a dynamic industry economy, are the key to success.

The previous can be overcome, but it takes a concentrated effort, according to the judge.On the other hand, the wind is the current big news, the most popular social media sensation.And the thin layer of hype that surrounds us.It could be a useful distraction, but our true challenge lies in overcoming the existing or transforming it, he said.

In today's world of polarizing views and conflicting behaviors, this expression is particularly pertinent, according to the judge.