Vaccines can be used to prevent cattle from lumpy skin disease, according to vets.

More than 75,000 cattle have already died as a result of lumpy skin disease in various states . Disease is contagious and causes fever, skin nodules, and cattle death .

PATNA: With the outbreak of lumpy skin disease around the world, veterinarians and health specialists have urged farmers to keep their cattle from becoming infected.Although no warning has been issued in the state on this disease, which has already impacted more than 15 states, some stragglery skin disease cases have been reported in Bihar and Jharkhand, according to veterinarians.According to them, more than 75,000 cattle have already died as a result of this disease in various states of the country.Dr Arun Shah, a viral disease specialist, said that if no remedial measures were taken, it would adversely effect a large cattle population in the state sooner or later.

He pointed out that lumpy skin disease is contagious and causes fever, skin nodules, and cattle death.Mosquitoes, flies, lice, and wasps spread the disease along with direct contact with cattle as well as contaminated food and water.However, this disease can be passed from infected cattle to non-infected cattle.The cattle are not contaminated with viruses.

With the precautionary drugs, the infected cattle should be treated effectively.Dr Shah said that the goat-pox vaccine is being used against the virus at present.Dr. Vikash Sharma, a well-known veterinarian, said the disease is spreading quickly in many states, and Bihar is unlikely to be an exception.Farmers in the state are obligated to keep their dairy farms clean and sanitary.

According to him, the milk yield of infected cattle is drastically reduced.However, contaminated cows or buffalo milk will not have a detrimental effect on human health if it is ground before consumption.As a large amount of milk in our region is processed after collection-either pasteurized, boiled, or powdered-the virus is likely to be destroyed, he said.Dr Balwant Sharan, a senior veterinarian in Bihar, said that checks should be made to check its spread, because the disease will certainly affect the local economy.

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