When classmates at Dave Chappelle's alma mater in DC slam him, he doesn't back down.

Dave Chappelle recently paid a surprise visit to his alma mater in Washington, D.C. One student reportedly said, I think you are childish, you handled it like a teenager, according to a news outlet.

Washington, D.C. — According to students recounting the visit, American comedian Dave Chappelle recently paid a surprise visit to his alma mater in Washington, DC, where one student reportedly said, I think you are childish, you handled it like a teenager, according to a news outlet.Chappelle has faced years of criticism and claims that he is a bigot because of his comedy comedy special The Closer, which was released on Netflix last month, but it The school offered him a place on November 23 to April 22 as a protester was reportedly forced to return to the original strategy.According to another student, I am better than any instrumentalist, artist, no matter what form you take in this class, I am better than any one of you right now.I am sure that will change.I'm sure you'll be household names soon enough.

He reportedly said, N are killed every day.He then said, The media isn't here, right?As a parent, I have to say I have a real problem.He was being extremely serious and using the N-word on the record.

Carla Sims, a spokesperson for the appellates, said to a news outlet, He spoke and said the n-word.Dave is even putting the school on the map, said Sims, adding that these children deserve an F for forgiveness, saying that he did not expect students to request a apology during the visit.But, leave them enough room to flourish.They're going to say things that are immature, according to a Duke Ellington spokesperson.

During the discussion with students and staff, Chappelle encouraged students to address him, but as a result, the supporters of Chappelle became the lone majority, according to her.According to Fox News, he also gave each student three tickets to his documentary Untitled and 600 meals to students and staff for Thanksgiving.

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